Teen Car Accidents

Teen car accidents in Atlanta, and throughout Georgia, are following the alarming national trends for young drivers. Teens are three times more likely to be involved in a fatal auto crash than other drivers and passengers. Car accidents are the leading cause of death for teens.

Teen car accidents have a higher fatality and injury rate because often teens are more likely to combine their inexperience with other dangerous behaviors. Teens may fail to wear their seatbelts, drive too fast, drink and drive, drive distracted while using a cell phone or texting, or have other teens in their car, which is also a distraction. The number of passengers in a teen’s car and the age at which they can carry passengers is restricted for this reason.

Georgia has enacted laws to help lower the number of teen car accidents. Joshua's Law mandates that teens become educated about driving if they want to drive at age 16. Without this, Georgia teens must wait until they reach 17 years of age before they can be licensed.

There are several ways to comply with the graduated licensing laws and more information can be found at the Georgia Department of Driver Services (DDS). The Georgia Driver Education Committee was created along with Joshua’s Law to monitor teen driving and to track the success of the program.

Atlanta car accident lawyers at Scholle Law, led by Charles Scholle, have helped families through the often life-changing and tragic consequences of these motor vehicle crashes. Because teen car accidents can be very traumatic for the teen and his or her family, it is very important to seek the counsel of an experienced attorney with the sensitivity and skill to handle not only your legal case, but the suffering both teens and experience after a teen car crash.

Across the country and throughout Atlanta and Georgia, the statistics are alarming. Teen car accidents result in thousands of teen deaths and hundreds of thousands of teen car accident injuries.

Most teen crashes happen in the teen driver’s first year of driving. And teen auto crashes are more likely to occur on Saturday and Sunday between 3 p.m. and midnight. It is very important that teens avoid the roads during these high-risk times.

But parental involvement in teen driving has also proven to lower the statistics. It is vitally important that parents understand that they hold the key to their teen’s driving safety. Parents and teens are entering into written agreements and commitments, to form a foundation for dialogue and commitment to safer driving. For more information on a sample parent teen safe driving agreement and what parents can do to keep their teen drivers safe, please go to the Atlanta Centers for Disease Control website and download the Parents Are the Key handbook that includes the agreement that parents can sign with their teen drivers.

In the event of a teen car accident, Scholle Law has the knowledge and skill to help families through the medical and legal issues involved. Our work as catastrophic personal injury lawyers gives us the depth of expertise needed to work with medical teams in all sorts of personal injuries that result from motor vehicle accidents. We guide our Atlanta clients through the financial and medical recovery after a teen car crash.

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE A FREE CONSULTATION WITH TEEN CAR ACCIDENT LAWYER CHARLES SCHOLLE and SCHOLLE LAW in Atlanta at 770-717-5100 and toll free at 1-866-972-5287

For over two decades, Scholle Law, led by Charles Scholle, has helped injured victims and their families manage the difficult recovery from accident and injury caused by others. We support families to secure their legal rights and the proper medical attention at times when they need that support most.

Please contact Scholle Law or call toll-free 1-866-972-5287 or in Atlanta (770) 717-5100 to set up a free consultation with no obligation.

From our main office in Gwinnett County, our teen car accident law firm serves clients with offices in Decatur, Buckhead and the Perimeter and we represent injured victims throughout Atlanta and Georgia.